3 Simple Things to Let Your Clients Know You Care

Updated: May 12


Recently, I shared this article about why we should not be shy about setting our lesson pricing, even in difficult times like these.  


I received such great feedback -- Firstly, I’m hearing that many of us feel lifted up (and a bit of weighty responsibility) acting as an encourager to so many families.  Secondly, I heard so many of you share about how you are doing whatever you’re able to do during this covid-19 crisis in order to lessen the load on families. 


From offering creative payment plans, to providing additional support and training for parents -- even offering extra (paid) lessons to kids with extra time on their hands… the list goes on, and is totally based on what each of us is able to do given our own circumstances.


I’m amazed and inspired.


Why? Friends! You’re showing how you’re thinking flexibly in order to meet the needs of your students, and to build value.  These kind of things make you -- the person and the expert -- indispensable to your clients.  


Remember, being indispensable doesn’t always have to mean that price is the only way we give.  That can take away from their perceived value of what we provide -- and be incredibly disheartening to us, the expert providers.  No one wants to haggle over a $10 difference in their fee.  So many times, people just need to know (and be reminded) that they have someone compassionately walking with them while they muddle through. 


I’d love to offer some ideas today that help us to do just that.

3 Simple Things to Let Your Clients Know You Care 

… that will build your value 

… and will cost you almost nothing.

Feel free to riff on this.  I also challenge you to take one idea and DO IT this week.  The only thing it costs is a little bit of time.  (And maybe a few stamps.)


  1. Parent Care.  Send a short individual note to each parent just to check in.  Ask them how they’re doing and what their challenges are in this season.  Is there anything you can do to make things easier? (Notice, I’m not saying to ask for feedback on the lesson you’re providing.  They may share that, but your aim is to let them know you’re caring about their experience and that you are listening to their feelings.)

  2. Student Love. Mail a personal card to your students.  Maybe include a picture of you two at the last student recital!  Let them know you’re glad you get to zoom with them each week and can’t wait to see them in person again soon.  Or let them know how proud you are of “X” milestone they’ve reached while in quarantine!

  3. Video Message. Find a well-lit place, set up your phone or laptop, and record a short video to say hello to your studio.  Have your cat say hello, play a short piece, tell a lame music joke, etc.!  (Pro tip:  Emailing video files can overwhelm email servers. Instead of emailing the actual video file, upload your video to Google Drive or your YouTube account on a private page and share just the link to the video.


Want to take this one step further? 

Make a list of ideas, then schedule one to do, say, every 2-3 weeks.  With consistency, you'll be building your value right into your relationships.  You'll be ahead of any potential issue and hear from your clients before it becomes a problem.  You'll earn their love and trust because they know you listen and care.  Who doesn't like that?



Now, for your challenge... What are you going to do this week? 


... Got another idea to add?  Please email me and I’ll share highlights in a future post. 


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© 2020 Erica Ward  |  Photography by Jamie Nease Portraits

Kailua-Kona Professional Musician | Musician in Kailua-Kona | Entrepreneurship 96740